Work with parents/carers in a way which encourages them to take an active role in their child’s play, learning and development

Qualification: NCFE CACHE Level 3 Diploma for the Early Years Educator
Unit: Unit 2.5: Work in partnership
Learning outcome: Be able to work with parents/carers in a way which encourages them to take an active role in their child’s play, learning and development
Assessment criteria: Work with parents/carers in a way which encourages them to take an active role in their child’s play, learning and development

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It is essential that parents and carers feel welcomed and involved in their child’s learning and development in an Early Years setting and that they are encouraged to take an active role in their child’s play, learning and development.

One way to encourage parents and carers to take an active role in their child’s play, learning and development are to maintain learning journeys. Learning journeys document a child’s learning and development over time and provide parents and carers with an insight into their child’s learning. Learning journeys are a valuable tool that can help to encourage communication and collaboration between parents, carers and practitioners.

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Another way to encourage parent and carer involvement is to offer workshops on topics such as learning through play, effective communication with children, or supporting children’s emotional development. Inviting parents and carers into the setting to participate in workshops is a great way to build positive relationships and create a sense of community.

Parents and carers may also be invited to the setting to take part in activities with their child, such as messy play, cooking or watching their child in a performance. Parents and carers with particular knowledge or skills may also be invited into the setting to share them.

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Noticeboards and displays can inform parents and carers about what their children have been learning and doing in the setting. This can include displaying artwork, writing, photographs or other items that have been created by the children.

It is also important to share information with parents and carers about how they can support their child’s learning at home. This could be done through newsletters, parent meetings or individual conversations during handover. Some Early Years settings may also lend out resources, such as books and toys for a child to take home. These conversations can help to maintain consistency between the home and Early Years settings.

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