Describe the role of the Early Years practitioner when supporting the development of speech, language and communication

Qualification: NCFE CACHE Level 3 Diploma for the Early Years Educator
Unit: Unit 3.10: Develop the speech, language and communication of children
Learning outcome: Understand how the Early Years practitioner supports the development of speech, language and communication of children
Assessment criteria: Describe the role of the Early Years practitioner when supporting the development of speech, language and communication

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As early years practitioners, it is our responsibility to ensure that children have the best possible start in life. This includes providing them with a supportive environment which allows their speech, language and communication skills to develop and flourish. In this blog post, we will explore the role of the early years practitioner in supporting the development of these vital communication skills.

Assessment and Identification of Needs

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The first step for an early years practitioner when supporting speech, language and communication development is to assess each child’s individual needs. This can be done through observation as well as administering formal assessments such as expressive language tests or articulation tests. After identifying any areas of weakness or delay, practitioners can then create a plan for intervention based on the child’s specific needs.

Creating a Supportive Environment

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It is also important for an early years practitioner to create an environment which encourages children to communicate effectively. This means providing them with opportunities to engage in meaningful conversations with adults and other children. Practitioners should also model good speech, language and communication skills in order to provide positive examples for children to follow. Additionally, they should use strategies such as open-ended questions or visual aids when communicating with children who are struggling to express themselves verbally.

Monitoring Progress

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Finally, it is essential for early years practitioners to monitor and track each child’s progress over time in order to ensure that they are making adequate gains in their speech, language and communication abilities. This can be done through ongoing assessment activities such as recording interactions between adults and children or giving regular language tests. By monitoring progress closely over time, practitioners can make sure that any interventions needed are effective and that each child is receiving the support they need to succeed.

Summary

In conclusion, it is clear that supporting the development of speech, language and communication skills is an important role for early years practitioners. Assessing individual needs, creating a supportive environment, and monitoring progress all play key roles in helping children become confident communicators who are prepared for success later on in life. It is our job as professionals to ensure that every child has access to these vital resources from the very beginning – by doing so we give them their best chance at success!

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