Analyse how theoretical perspectives in relation to personal, social and emotional development inform current frameworks

Qualification: NCFE CACHE Level 3 Diploma for the Early Years Educator
Unit: Unit 3.12: Promote the personal, social and emotional development of children
Learning outcome: Understand theory and current frameworks underpinning personal, social and emotional development of children
Assessment criteria: Analyse how theoretical perspectives in relation to personal, social and emotional development inform current frameworks

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In order to understand the current frameworks, such as the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS), used to develop and support children’s personal, social and emotional development, it is important to consider the theoretical perspectives of child development. This blog post will explore how the different theories of child development inform the EYFS framework.

Freud’s Psychoanalytic Theory

Freud’s psychoanalytic theory is one of the earliest theories of child development. Freud believed that early childhood experiences have a significant influence on later stages of life by affecting an individual’s personality and behavior. According to Freud’s theory, a person’s character is determined by their unconscious mind which is made up of three parts; the id (instinctive needs and desires), ego (conscious wishes) and superego (moral values). This theory has been taken into account when developing the EYFS framework as it helps professionals understand how children think, feel, and behave in order for them to be able to create an environment which supports their emotional wellbeing.

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Piaget’s Cognitive Theory

Piaget’s cognitive theory states that a child develops through four distinct stages; sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operational, and formal operational. Each stage has its own way of thinking which develops over time as they learn more about their environment and themselves. For example, during the sensorimotor stage (birth – 2 years old) infants are learning through hands-on exploration with objects around them. This theory has been incorporated into current frameworks such as EYFS by recognizing that young children develop skills at different rates based on their age group. Therefore practitioners are encouraged to provide appropriate activities so that each individual can reach their full potential while being supported at every level of development.

Vygotsky’s Sociocultural Theory

Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory places emphasis on a child’s social environment in order for them to gain knowledge from adults or more experienced peers through guidance and instruction known as scaffolding. According to this theory a child learns best when they are in an environment where collaboration between adults or peers is encouraged. The EYFS framework acknowledges this idea by promoting positive relationships between practitioners and children so that each individual can reach their potential within a supportive setting with access to resources necessary for their learning journey.

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Summary

By understanding different theoretical perspectives related to personal, social and emotional development in children we can better inform our current frameworks such as EYFS which are designed to foster these skills from birth up until five years old before transitioning them into school environments. It is evident that each theory holds value for helping us further develop our understanding about how best we can support young children through early years settings so they can reach their highest potential both socially and emotionally.

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