Identify children’s additional needs in relation to expected stages of development

Qualification: NCFE CACHE Level 3 Diploma for the Early Years Educator
Unit: Unit 3.13: Support children with additional needs
Learning outcome: Understand the role of early intervention in partnership working
Assessment criteria: Identify children’s additional needs in relation to expected stages of development

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As an early years practitioner, it is important to be able to identify additional needs in relation to expected stages of development. Without the proper understanding of children’s developmental stages, it can be difficult to recognize when a child is struggling and requires additional support. This blog post will cover the different ways an early years practitioner can identify a child’s additional needs in relation to expected stages of development.

Observation and Assessment

The first step for identifying a child’s additional needs is observation and assessment. An early years practitioner should observe and assess each individual child on a regular basis to determine their current stage of development. It is important for practitioners to have knowledge of the expected stages of development for their age group so that they can compare what they observe with what is considered “normal” or “expected”. If there are any discrepancies, then further action may be necessary.

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Communication with Parents/Carers

It is also essential that an early years practitioner communicates regularly with parents/carers about a child’s progress. Parents/carers often have valuable information that can help in assessing the child’s current situation, such as details about their home life or health issues. The more information available, the better equipped the practitioner will be in determining if there are any additional needs present in the child.

Intervention Strategies

Once any additional needs are identified, it is important for practitioners to develop intervention strategies that will help support the individual child as well as their families and peers. These strategies should focus on both short-term goals (such as providing immediate assistance) and long-term goals (such as creating systems that promote successful outcomes). Practitioners should also strive to create a safe and supportive environment where all children feel respected, valued, and accepted regardless of their individual circumstances.

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Summary

Identifying children’s additional needs in relation to expected stages of development can be a challenging task for early years practitioners but one that is essential in helping children reach their potentials. By observing each individual child regularly, communicating with parents/carers whenever possible, and developing intervention strategies tailored specifically to each situation, practitioners will be able to provide necessary support while still allowing each child’s unique personality and abilities shine through. With these steps taken into consideration, early years practitioners will be able to successfully identify children’s additional needs while still promoting healthy growth and development at all levels.

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