Describe how the Early Years practitioner provides opportunities for sustained shared thinking to support children’s emergent mathematical development

Qualification: NCFE CACHE Level 3 Diploma for the Early Years Educator
Unit: Unit 3.6: Develop emergent mathematical skills of children
Learning outcome: Understand the role of the Early Years practitioner in relation to supporting children’s emergent mathematical development
Assessment criteria: Describe how the Early Years practitioner provides opportunities for sustained shared thinking to support children’s emergent mathematical development

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Early years practitioners play an important role in supporting young children’s mathematical development. This blog post will focus on how early years practitioners provide opportunities for sustained shared thinking to support emergent mathematical development.

Sustained shared thinking, or “talk”, is an essential component of learning mathematics. It refers to a process where two or more people interact and share ideas in order to explore and develop understanding. This type of interaction is particularly important in the early stages of mathematical development as it allows children to exchange ideas, ask questions, and build upon each other’s thoughts.

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The role of the early years practitioner is to create a supportive environment where sustained shared thinking can take place. This may include setting up activities that encourage talk between children, such as counting games or problem-solving tasks. Additionally, the practitioner should be actively involved in the talk process by asking open-ended questions that promote dialogue and engage multiple perspectives. Asking questions such as “How do you think this works?” or “What do you think will happen next?” can help foster creative thought and spark further discussion among the children.

Another way for early years practitioners to support sustained shared thinking is by providing feedback which promotes deeper understanding. For example, when a child makes a mistake during a math activity, instead of simply correcting them, the practitioner could ask the child what they think went wrong and how they could make it better next time. This encourages critical reflection and helps children develop problem-solving skills which are essential for successful math learning.

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In conclusion, creating opportunities for sustained shared thinking is crucial for young children’s emergent mathematical development. Early years practitioners have an important role to play in this process by designing activities that promote dialogue between children, engaging with them through questioning, and providing feedback that encourages deeper understanding. Ultimately, this type of interactive learning environment will help lay the foundation for future success in mathematics skills and beyond!

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