Explain the role of the Early Years practitioner in encouraging parents/carers to take an active role in their child’s play, learning and development in preparation for school readiness

Qualification: NCFE CACHE Level 3 Diploma for the Early Years Educator
Unit: Unit 3.7: Understand the needs of the child in preparing for school
Learning outcome: Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s school readiness
Assessment criteria: Explain the role of the Early Years practitioner in encouraging parents/carers to take an active role in their child’s play, learning and development in preparation for school readiness

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As an early years practitioner, it is important to understand how to nurture and support the development of children in preparation for school readiness. School readiness is a child’s ability to make successful transitions into education settings and involves a holistic approach which takes into account physical, emotional, social, intellectual and cognitive abilities. An early years practitioner can play an important role in helping children meet these developmental milestones by encouraging parents/carers to take an active role in their child’s play, learning and development.

Early Years Practitioners Can Support Parents/Carers

Early years practitioners can provide support for parents/carers by providing them with knowledge about the importance of play-based activities for promoting learning and development. They can also help parents/carers understand how to use everyday experiences as learning opportunities for their children—for example, role modeling appropriate behaviors or talking through tasks that are being completed. Parental involvement is essential in promoting positive outcomes in children’s lives as it allows them to develop a sense of security and trust which will be beneficial when they enter primary school.

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Early Years Practitioners Can Facilitate Play-Based Activities

Play-based activities are essential in helping young children learn and develop the skills they need for school readiness. It helps them learn how to socialize with their peers, practice problem solving skills, explore their environment, express their emotions appropriately, show resilience when faced with challenging tasks etc. Early years practitioners can facilitate these activities by providing stimulating materials that encourage open ended exploration such as blocks or sand trays; setting up different zones within the room; creating opportunities for group activities such as circle time; and providing resources that promote literacy and numeracy skills such as books or counting games.

Early Years Practitioners Can Monitor Development

In addition to facilitating play-based activities and supporting parents/carers, early years practitioners should also be monitoring each individual’s progress towards school readiness so that any areas of concern can be identified early on. This can be done through observations of children’s play activities or interaction with other adults/children; tracking progress against developmental milestones; assessing language proficiency using age appropriate assessments; or using parent questionnaires that ask questions about home routines or family dynamics. These assessments should be used to inform practice so that any gaps in learning can be addressed quickly before they have a negative impact on school readiness.

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Summary

It is clear that early years practitioners have a critical role to play when it comes to preparing children for school readiness by encouraging parents/carers to take an active role in their child’s play, learning and development. Through facilitating play-based activities, offering support for parents/carer sand monitoring progress against predetermined outcomes, early years practitioners are able to ensure that all children have the best possible chance at success when they enter primary school.

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