Describe approaches to planning to meet individual needs of children in the: short term, long term

Qualification: NCFE CACHE Level 3 Diploma for the Early Years Educator
Unit: Unit 3.8: Understand how to plan to meet the needs of the developing child
Learning outcome: Understand approaches to planning when working with children from birth to 7 years
Assessment criteria: Describe approaches to planning to meet individual needs of children in the: short term, long term

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As an early years practitioner, one of the key tasks is to ensure that each child’s individual needs are met. This means understanding the unique abilities and interests of each child in your classroom and then planning activities which will help them to develop, grow, and achieve their full potential. In this blog post, we’ll discuss two approaches to planning—short-term and long-term—and how they can be used to meet individual needs of children in early years education.

Short-Term Planning

Short-term planning refers to activities that are planned on a weekly or monthly basis. These could include activities like language development, math games, art projects, music lessons, etc. The goal with short-term planning is to provide a variety of stimulating activities that will help young students learn and grow. When planning short-term activities for individual children, it may be necessary to differentiate instruction based on the needs of each student. For instance, if a student has difficulty with language development, you may need to adjust the language activities accordingly so that they can still participate while also getting the support they need.

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Long-Term Planning

Long-term planning refers to activities that are planned on a semester or yearly basis. These could include activities like field trips, special projects or disciplinary courses such as physical education or health classes. When creating long-term plans for individual students, it is important to consider their specific goals and objectives for their academic career as well as any special considerations that need to be taken into account due to disabilities or other factors affecting their learning ability. For instance, if a student has difficulty with fine motor skills then you may want to plan an activity where they can participate without having to use their hands (like using LEGOs or clay models instead of drawing). Doing this allows students with special needs to engage in meaningful learning experiences without feeling overwhelmed by tasks they may not be able to complete yet.

Summary

In conclusion, when it comes to meeting the individual needs of children in early years education it is important for practitioners to create both short-term and long-term plans which take into consideration the unique abilities and interests of each child in their classroom. By doing this practitioners can ensure that all students are receiving quality instruction which meets their individual needs while also allowing them opportunities for growth and development throughout their academic career. With careful planning and differentiation of instruction based on individual needs early years practitioners can make sure every student reaches his/her full potential!

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